On January 6, 1934, the legendary Herbert Chapman died, aged 55.

Chapman, who had won the FA Cup and two Division One titles with Huddersfield Town in the early Twenties, agreed to join the Gunners as manager in the summer of 1925.

In his first season at Highbury, the new manager steered the Gunners to an FA Cup quarter final and a second-placed finish in the First Division; the highest league placing in their history. Within a year, Arsenal had reached their first FA Cup final.

However, Chapman would have to wait another three years to bring the famous trophy to Highbury, overcoming Huddersfield Town at Wembley in 1930. The triumph signalled the start of Arsenal’s prolonged dominance of English football and, with the likes of Alex James and Cliff Bastin in the ranks, Arsenal became the envy of the football world.

Within a season the Club romped to its first ever league title, racking up a record-breaking 66 points in the process. After missing out the following year, the Gunners duly lifted the Division One title in 1932/33, wearing their now famous red shirt with white sleeves for the first time.

But in January 1934, after watching an Arsenal third team match against Guildford City nursing a cold, Chapman’s condition quickly worsened. Soon afterwards, pneumonia set in. During the early hours of January 6, 1934, Chapman died at his home in Hendon aged 55.

However, the foundations had been laid by the Club's late manager and a second successive title was delivered in the following May. And that swiftly became three in a row under the management of ex-director George Allison in 1934/35.

Copyright 2014 The Arsenal Football Club plc. Permission to use quotations from this article is granted subject to appropriate credit being given to www.arsenal.com as the source 5 Jan 2014