George Graham led Arsenal to an unprecedented domestic Cup double in 1993 - thanks in no small part to a couple of unlikely heroes.

Stephen Morrow's goal saw off Sheffield Wednesday in the Coca Cola Cup Final and, when the Yorkshire club came back for more in the FA Cup Final, Andy Linighan's last-gasp header compounded their Wembley woes in a rain-soaked replay.

In April, Morrow's moment of glory was followed by a rather longer period of pain. The Irishman slammed in a low drive to clinch the League Cup after Paul Merson had matched John Harkes' opener, and the celebrations began in earnest when the final whistle blew at Wembley.

Linighan was a worthy matchwinner having played on with a broken nose after a dangerous first-half challenge from Wednesday striker Mark Bright. His late header was the most precious of the eight goals Linighan scored in 156 appearances for Arsenal.

Unfortunately, Tony Adams' attempt to lift Morrow into the air ended with a heavy landing for the matchwinner, a broken arm and his early exit from the pitch on a stretcher. Arsenal's lap of honour was completed without the hero of the hour but Morrow was back at Wembley in May to receive his League Cup medal before the FA Cup Final.

Now it was Linighan's turn in the spotlight although both sets of fans - not to mention millions around the world - had to sit through two dreary contests before the centre back's coup de grace.

Arsenal, having beaten Yeovil, Leeds, Nottingham Forest, Ipswich and - most memorably - Tottenham en route to the Final, took the lead thanks to Ian Wright's precise downward header. Wednesday hit back and David Hirst forced a replay. It was by no means a classic and the replay wasn't much better.

Wright again gave Arsenal a first-half advantage, slipping the ball past Chris Woods after Alan Smith's flick had sent the striker through on goal. Once again Wednesday rallied and a deflected equaliser from Chris Waddle forced extra time for the second time in five days.

The longest ever FA Cup Final looked certain to become the first decided by a penalty shoot-out, but Linighan had other ideas. He met Merson's last-minute corner with a firm header and Woods could only palm the ball up into the air and over the line. The Cup was Arsenal's for the sixth time.

Linighan was a worthy matchwinner having played on with a broken nose after a dangerous first-half challenge from Wednesday striker Mark Bright. His late header was the most precious of the eight goals Linighan scored in 156 appearances for Arsenal.

The replay, staged on a Thursday night, was notable for a number of reasons. It attracted the smallest crowd (62,267) for an FA Cup Final at Wembley. The kick-off was delayed by half-an-hour because an accident on the M1; the first time a Wembley kick-off had been delayed since the 'White Horse' Final in 1923.

David O'Leary, who still holds the record for the most Arsenal appearances, played his final game for the Club. And shortly before Linighan's intervention, Smith received the only yellow card of his professional career.

A Day In Time - May 20, 1993
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Copyright 2014 The Arsenal Football Club plc. Permission to use quotations from this article is granted subject to appropriate credit being given to www.arsenal.com as the source 16 Dec 2008